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Hungarian animated feature Feherlofia (1981) manifests an unusually consistent, highly simplified style visibly influenced by imagery of old Indian and Mayan culture, and possibly art of other ancient nations in Africa and Oceania. The visual stylization clearly establishes the mythical tone of the story that comes even with the proper delight in erotic allusions (most of the time rather hardly concealed).

The film also shows off its awareness of the cinematic potential or rather its extension by means of animation. Hence we witness numerous complete transformations of image and also get details like the one when a character looks at other two through the fingers of his hand, as he covered his eyes in fear before.

FConsidering the slow-paced narrative that dwells on the appropriate repetition of certain tasks and most of the time appears more than clear, you might find yourselves enjoying the film purely as an audio-visual trip. That is also why we recommend to watch Feherlofia without the original audio and to use soundtrack such as some neat Four Tet compilation. You might find yourselves in the place of those who found the dark side of the rainbow.

Available on Youtube

 

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‘That was TERRIBLE.’
– Anne

Yes. Under the Skin (2013) can become a mighty frustrating experience if you’re not used to watching films with a bit of a detachment & if you do not fancy Scarlett Johansson as much as some of us.

‘It was good.’
– Your Beloved Writer (S. M.)

Don’t be afraid, my Near and Dear ones. This film is a pretty striking and honest reflection on Scottish people and land. Again, don’t be afraid.

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I mentioned Charlie Kaufman when I wrote about characters of American Hustle (YES, I am SO quoting myself right now!).
To become a slightly more believable and concrete, I watched most of his films again so that I could explain what exactly I meant by that ‘modernity’ I was talking about. Turns out that it is something embarrassingly different from what I first thought. Well, WHATEVER! Here it is.

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Werner Herzog travelled to Antarctica, where he met the strangest kind of people, unusually inspired and having an enormous power to lead their lives alongside this momentum.

There are particular things about this film that enchant me:

Herzog’s voice, seemingly uncertain around English and peculiarly unfitting to the florid expressions he uses in his voiceover.
I do not think I will ever forget the couple of comforting words he had for Libor Zícha, Czech exile, who was not even able to talk about the ‘drama’ he lived through escaping from behind the iron curtain.

Astonishing music chosen so well that it seems inherent to the image, giving it magnificence you could possibly feel while watching certain Malick’s images, except that Herzog’s thoughts of Christianity point towards Tarkovsky and penetrate deeper into European’s mind, since we instinctively do not believe in American spectacle.

Disorientation of the little penguin you cry for. I am sure you will know the feeling.

EatEotW

These impressions, however, only contribute to form Herzog’s giant overarching question about human origin and destiny, which overwhelm you and makes you feel a little uneasy. It might be that the end of human race is scientifically assured, but the choir at the very end of film sings about LIGHT and the message is not that of resignation.

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005) is inspired by the “noaar” film.

That means: You get the heroes with a complicated and (sometimes not so) dark past, who wonder in the bleak streets, deep in thoughts + the story being complicated so that you almost do not know what is happening and as well as the characters you are swayed from one place to another, meeting mysterious people and getting even more mysterious information.

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